BridgeMojo is ACBL accredited bridge teacher Morris "Mojo" Jones, offering games and bridge classes for the greater Pasadena area and San Gabriel Valley.

Bridge Games

Join us for our weekly Monday evening duplicate bridge game for non-Life Masters. This is a sanctioned ACBL bridge game for new bridge players with aspirations of enjoying the pleasures of modern bridge anywhere in the world.

Bridge Classes

Mojo offers classes through PCC Extension for brand new and continuing bridge players, offering Audrey Grant's acclaimed Better Bridge curriculum.

Bridge Basics III — Popular Conventions

Starts April 11 Information and signup here

ACBL Plastic Playing Cards

My desk with boards, cards, and the Playbridge Dealer4 machine.

Morris Jones
March 11, 2018

When I was deciding how to equip my bridge club, I took my cues from the ACBL North American Bridge Championships. As the pinnacle of tournament play, and heavy-duty supply usage, I had a strong bias toward their selections.

I purchased "Neo Classic" bidding boxes. (They take more space than the folding boxes, but are more durable.) I bought "Imperial-Plus" duplicate boards to use in a Dealer4 dealing machine, Cosco tables (the MECO tables are good too but have minor problems).

Sectional Tournament at Clubs March 19

Our first "special event" at the BridgeMojo club will be a STaC (Sectional Tournament at Clubs) game on Monday, March 19.

The game will start at our regular time of 7:15 p.m., but we will play a bit longer: 21 boards instead of 14, finishing a bit before 10:00 p.m. We won't hold a postmortem that evening, so it's about the same ending time for those who like to stick around after playing.

So what is this event and why that evening?

To become a Life Master, you must have been awarded at least 75 silver points. Silver points are only awarded at sectional tournaments. (There's another way to look at this requirement: It's the ACBL's way of keeping attendance up at sectionals!)

Guide to the Convention Card

Morris Jones
Feb. 11, 2018

At the Feb. 5 BridgeMojo postmortem I gave an overview of the standard Convention Card. The object was to show the various regions of the card and how it was laid out:

  • The right half covers constructive bidding (our side opens)
  • The left half upper two-thirds cover competitive bidding (their side opens)
  • The left half lower portion covers defensive signals and carding

Each of the major areas are divided with titles that explain themselves fairly well, for example:

  • Notrump openings and responses
  • Major suit openings and responses
  • Minor suit openings and responses
  • Two-level openings and responses

The competitive bidding section on the left isn't quite as organized as the constructive section, but then competitive bidding is messy too. :)

Bridge needs directors

Twelve tables in play at the BridgeMojo game

Morris Jones

Directing is fascinating

When I first noticed bridge, of course the game was fascinating. The detail and the multi-level depth of the game continue to enthrall.

When I first started playing duplicate bridge and visiting tournaments, I found another fascination in the organization of the game itself — the movements of boards and players, the many ways of scoring that would shift the play strategy.

Early on I realized that I could play team games at home with nothing more than two or three tables of players, some score cards, and a few duplicate boards. My first directing was done at my house or others' houses exactly that way.

Web movements for 14-board games

Six board sets ready for a Festival game

by Morris "Mojo" Jones
14 January 2018

What is this Web movement?

Tournament players have mostly seen Web movements by now. For most larger events, at least one section in the game will be set up using this unfamiliar pattern of play.

In this case, I'm talking about the order of the boards and the players in a duplicate bridge game. The two most common movements in bridge, Mitchell and Howell, pre-date the game of bridge itself, and were used for duplicate whist tournaments.

In the 1970s, a director named John Harris, who went by the nickname of "Spider," invented a general movement that would have every player in the game playing the same group of boards. We call them Web movements in honor of Spider.

My evolving bridge mission

This has been a fast-moving week here at Sea Island with the Audrey Grant Bridge Festival. We've done some things that have never been done, and that has changed me, personally.

When I created my own bridge club this year (last year) I gave it a mission statement. Part of that mission was to embrace, enjoy, and share the game of bridge as it has evolved in 2018, rather than 1978.

Today's bridge is more technological, complex, and challenging. It's also more exciting, accessible, and social. Bridge is a more interesting game today than it was fifty years ago.

Bridge at its core has changed. Modern bidding is more precise, competitive, and playful than it was in 1978 -- even while the play of the hand remains timeless.

The world surrounding the core game has changed tremendously. Here are some of the things I have seen come into existence since I started playing bridge:

Class Schedule, Winter/Spring 2018

Mojo with Audrey Grant in Toronto, Summer 2017
Mojo with Audrey Grant at the Better Bridge Teachers Convention, Toronto, 2017

Bridge I — An Introduction

This is the first class from Audrey Grant's acclaimed Better Bridge program.

This is the starting point for a lifetime of fascination with bridge. No experience required.

Newcomers will learn the mechanics of the game through its historical predecessors: whist and auction bridge. This is not a lecture class! You'll be playing cards at the table from the beginning.

Students who have played a little bridge will enjoy this refresher and update on the fundamentals of play and Standard American bidding.